Last edited by Nezil
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

4 edition of The Yuchi green corn ceremonial found in the catalog.

The Yuchi green corn ceremonial

form and meaning

by W. L. Ballard

  • 322 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by University of California, American Indian Studies Center in Los Angeles, CA .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Yuchi Indians.,
  • Indians of North America -- Southern States -- Rites and ceremonies.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementW.L. Ballard.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxiii, 81 p. :
    Number of Pages81
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL16565651M

    The remaining Yuchi villages in East Tennessee, decimated by disease and hostile neighbors, fled to join other Yuchi living down on the Savannah and Chattahoochee Rivers and the Panhandle of Florida, where they failed to be distinguished from the Creek (Muskhogean) peoples that surrounded/dominated the area (some Yuchi remained and were. Other articles where Yuchi is discussed: Native American dance: Northeast and Southeast Indians: The Creek, Yuchi, Seminole, and other tribes of the southeastern United States greatly emphasize the summer green corn harvest ceremony, or Busk. Before the removal of many of those tribes to reservations in Oklahoma, they acquired a few dances outside their own traditions.

    BOOK REVIEWS through pronominal references (pp. ). This analysis shows that the shift to Eng-lish does not rob Yuchi ceremonial speech of its "traditionalizing" power, either. In his discussion of the centrally important Green Corn Ceremony, so often treated. A kind of corn flour, tsukhá, is made by pounding up dried corn in the mortar. At intervals the contents of the mortar are scooped up and emptied into the sieve basket. The operator holds a large basket tray in her lap and over it shakes and sifts the pounded corn until .

    Dance, Green Corn Ceremony, and Soup Dance. Because Jackson's exposition of Yuchi ceremonial life, inspired by Urban's () discourse-centered approach, is through the documentation and interpretation of ritual oratorical performance, it is especially interesting from a linguistic point of view. The encouraging implicit message of this book is that extensive cultural change does not necessarily entail the extinction of ethnographic interest."-R. H. Barnes, Anthropos -- R. H. Barnes * Anthropos * "One may now consider the outstanding scholarship of Jason Baird Jackson in Yuchi Ceremonial : Jason Baird Jackson.


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The Yuchi green corn ceremonial by W. L. Ballard Download PDF EPUB FB2

The Yuchi green corn ceremonial: Form and meaning [Ballard, W. L] on The Yuchi green corn ceremonial book shipping on qualifying offers. The Yuchi green corn ceremonial: Form and meaningAuthor: W.

L Ballard. Subtopic: Green Corn Festival. Grade Level: 5th - 6th. Author: Erin Jessop. Background: The Green Corn Festival (also called Green Corn Dance or Ceremony) is a Native American celebration and religious ceremony. The dance is held by the Creek, Cherokee, Seminole, Yuchi, and Iroquois Indians as well as other Native American tribes.

The Green Corn Ceremony is the heart of the ancient spiritual practices of the Southeastern Indigenous peoples.

The Yuchi traditions are important because they are the mother “squareground” to all Southeastern tribes, and are often called upon today to rekindle the Rites at resurrected squaregrounds.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Ballard, W.L. Yuchi green corn ceremonial. Los Angeles: University of California, American Indian Studies Center, Yuchi Ceremonial Life: Performance, Meaning, and Tradition in a Contemporary American Indian (Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians) [Jackson, Jason Baird] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

Yuchi Ceremonial Life: Performance, Meaning, and Tradition in a Contemporary American Indian (Studies in the Anthropology of North American Indians)Cited by: To read Yuchi Ceremonial Life is to discover how little one knows about life, the past, and thousands of faceless peoples who were here in advance of the Euro-Americans.

In short, this is a wonderful, perceptive study for those with interests in native history, ethnography, anthropology, and Americana.”—.

green corn ceremonialism in the eastern woodlands Download green corn ceremonialism in the eastern woodlands or read online books in PDF, EPUB, Tuebl, and Mobi Format. Click Download or Read Online button to get green corn ceremonialism in the eastern woodlands book now. This site is like a library, Use search box in the widget to get ebook.

The Yuchi continue their important ceremonies such as the Green Corn Ceremony of summer. They also maintain three ceremonial grounds in Oklahoma. Some members belong to the Native American Church and Methodist congregations.

Inthe Yuchi tribe received a grant from the Administration for Native Americans Comprehensive Community Survey and. The Green Corn Ceremony (Busk) is an annual ceremony practiced among various Native American peoples associated with the beginning of the yearly corn harvest. Busk is a term given to the ceremony by white traders, the word being a corruption of the Creek word puskita (pusketv) for "a fast".

These ceremonies have been documented ethnographically throughout the North American Eastern. Each Yuchi settlement is led by a traditional town chief and continues to hold an annual series of ceremonies at its square-ground site.

The most important of these is the midsummer green corn ceremony. Traditionally Yuchi people were subsistence farmers, but today Yuchi participate in. W.L. Ballard—The Yuchi Green Corn Ceremonial: Form and Meaning American Indian Studies Center, 80pp, University of California, Los AngelesCall Number E 75 Cam -- An excellent brief overview of the Yuchi Ceremony its form and structure.

W.L. Ballard—unpublished manuscript Uchean Lexicon a set of three lexicons assembled by LewFile Size: KB. Get this from a library. Yuchi ceremonial life: performance, meaning, and tradition in a contemporary American Indian community.

[Jason Baird Jackson] -- The Yuchis are one of the least known yet most distinctive of the Native groups in the American southeast. Located in late prehistoric times in eastern Tennessee, they played an important historical. Included are chapters dealing with Yuchi history, ceremonial life, and "Indian football," as well as valuable music culture information about Stomp, Arbor, Green Corn, and Soup Dances.

The book makes a valuable contribution to literature about tribes originating in the southeastern US, and is even more valuable as a model of commitment to the. The encouraging implicit message of this book is that extensive cultural change does not necessarily entail the extinction of ethnographic interest."-R.

Barnes, Anthropos -- R. Barnes * Anthropos * "One may now consider the outstanding scholarship of Jason Baird Jackson in Yuchi Ceremonial Life.

Yuchi dress preserved garment types once generally characteristic of clothing on the American frontier. For men, the most characteristically Yuchi garment was known in English as a "green corn jacket." Its form, characterized by a large ruffled cape, is derived from European frock : University of Oklahoma Press.

Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Author of Essays on African literature, The Yuchi green corn ceremonial W.

Ballard |. Green Corn Festivals - Also called the Green Corn Ceremonies, this both a celebration and religious ceremony, primarily practiced by the peoples of the Eastern Woodlands and the Southeastern tribes including the Creek, Cherokee, Seminole, Yuchi, Iroquois, and others.

The ceremony typically coincides in the late summer and is tied to the ripening of the. The Hardcover of the Yuchi Ceremonial Life: Performance, Meaning, and Tradition in a Contemporary American Indian Community by Jason Baird Jackson, Frank Jackson captures in vivid detail the performance, impact, and motivations behind such rituals as the Stomp Dance, the Green Corn Ceremony, and the Soup Dance and discusses their continuing Pages: Membership to a ceremonial ground is based upon the mother’s home Ground membership.

One usually attends the annual Green Corn ceremonies at their home ceremonial ground. Many Euchee people reside outside the area and return for Green Corn at their ceremonial grounds. Although there are three active ceremonial grounds, the Euchee are one Size: KB.

Therefore, corn also played an important part in their religious and ceremonial of the important ceremonies among the people of the Southeastern Woodlands was the Green Corn Ceremony or puskita (which became Busk in English) which was an expression of gratitude for a successful corn crop.

The ceremony was held after the harvest and was. Ceremonial scratching was a common practice during the Green Corn Dance among the Cherokee, Creek, Seminole, Yuchi, and Catawba tribes.

It took place just before the Feather Dance on the second day. Those participating in the ceremony would use various methods to inflict deep scratches on their bodies, particularly their backs.Yuchi myths about the creation of the world. Why The Cedar Tree Is Red: Yuchi legend about the people defeating an evil magician.

Recommended Books on Yuchi Mythology Southeastern Native American Legends: Book comparing the traditional stories of the Yuchi and other Southeast tribes. Sponsored Links Additional Resources Green Corn Festival.Ceremonial making of new fire, clan dances mimicking totemic ancestors, dances propitiating evilly-inclined spirits and thanking various beneficent ones as well as inducing them to continue their benefits, scarification of the males for sacrifice and purification, taking an emetic as a purifier, the partaking of the first green corn of the.